Pin 5:29 – 60 Second Version

If you’ve been following the production of Jason Rugg’s Pin 5:29, then you’re in luck because the 60 second version of the film is finally here!

Check out the film below.

There may very well be a longer version that is released at a later date. This longer version would explore a more atmospheric pacing in the beginning to give a more detailed backstory leading toward the eventual end.

Stay tuned!

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Pin 5:29 – Production

While 31 Days of Reviews was dominating my blog, I didn’t have much time to write about the newest production I’ve been a part of. Throughout October, I jumped back into the producer’s chair for a new short film by Jason Rugg called Pin 5:29!

I don’t have a ton of insight about pre-production because I was incredibly busy with other things. The other producer on the film helped with casting and some script doctoring. I managed to be able to help with securing the location and planning for the actual shoot day, making sure everything ran on schedule and all that.

On the day of the shoot, we had an early crew call. This allowed us to get the equipment set up and start practicing all the things we would have to do. It helped us to be a lot more prepared. When the actor showed up at his call time, we were able to brief him, get him in costume, and jump right in.

Everything was in the same location, just different rooms. This made it easier to transfer equipment from scene to scene. It was just a matter of moving things. We had craft services set up in a nearby room. I think the location served everything really well.

For the most part, we shot in chronological order. I had it organized as much as possible by what lens we would be using to get each shot. There were definitely some interesting shots included in the shot list for this one. You can get a peek at one of the interesting shots in the picture below.


There were a couple of hiccups along the way, something I attribute to having one less set of hands than what we were planning to have. In the end though, we finished everything pretty close to the scheduled time, and the director is very happy with it.

From what I’ve seen in editing thus far, it’s looking really good. The director is excited about it. I’m excited about it. I can’t wait to show it off. We’re aiming for a 60 second cut at first. There may be a secondary cut that is a tad longer, but for the time being, the 60 second cut is the main focus.

Stay tuned for Pin 5:29!

Exit Interview

Don’t let the title deceive you. I’m not leaving any jobs.

This post will be about the short film Exit Interview, directed by Jason Rugg, which I recently produced. Conceptualized as an entry for the 2017 Rode Reel competition, Exit Interview follows a man who doesn’t understand that his ideal girlfriend is just not that into him.

Going into the production of this film, my role was more of a line producer. This means that my main job was to keep the production on time, to make sure that everything happened and stayed on schedule.

Over the last few productions I’ve been a part of, I’ve used Shot Lister to help with this. I definitely have some complaints about the current state of the program, but it has the potential to be a very nice organizational tool. I would suggest checking it out. It might be of use to you.

We had a small crew, but there was a bit more help than we usually have. Rugg was directing. I was doing my producing role. Erik Leal of E Leal Productions was running audio and helping with lighting. Rugg also brought in someone to record behind the scenes video and assist when needed. We had three cast members, and two groups of extras throughout the day.

It was an all day shoot. As a crew member, I was there from 9:00am till almost 10:00pm. All of the scenes were shot at a central location, so break down and set up throughout the day wasn’t incredibly difficult. Overall, the day was very eventful and a good learning experience for everyone involved.

You can view the Behind the Scenes video below.

As for editing, that was a bit of a challenge. Everyone just has so much going on, its hard to set time aside. We managed to get an edit done for the Rode Reel deadline. It’s so nice to see how everything came together in the edit.

I’m a really big fan of how the locations look and the performance of the actress who plays Amy, Emma Baker. She was fantastic on set, and her performance comes off really well in the final film. I’m super pleased.

You can see the Rode Reel submission below!

At some point in the future, there may be a director’s cut that would give a little more freedom in the edit without the Rode competition restrictions. If that comes to pass, I will be sharing that as well.